A Little White House Bed and Breakfast

Alittlewhitehouse is a bed and breakfast located at 916 E Reynosa Ave. in De Leon, Texas. It is currently owned by Carrie Morris. The house was originally built in the 1930s by Mr. and Mrs.Sloan who later sold the house to Robert and Faye Howard, Carrie’s grandparents,  in 1967. The house has remained in the family since then but has been renovated and fully restored in the last few years to give it an antique French country vibe. It has three main bedrooms, one bathroom, a kitchen, a laundry room, two sitting porches, and is fully furnished. Furthermore, Alittlewhitehouse provides complimentary bicycles for residents to use in order to explore downtown De Leon and enjoy the laid-back small-town lifestyle. Additionally, it has a pack and play for guest’s children upon request.

Alittlewhitehouse can comfortably sleep six people and more sleeping accommodations can be provided if needed. The cost to stay per night is $165.00 or $185.00 including breakfast. There is a two-night minimum stay on holidays and cancellations can be made up to seven days before your reservation for a full refund. With that being said, Carrie invites you to “come on down and pop open the screen door, enjoy the porch, and drink lots of ice tea while you are here. That’s how her granny liked it!” To make reservations call (254) 979-4670.

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Woven Roots

**Mention this website and receive 5% off your purchase of any kitchen, bath, or body care items. **

If you are looking to do a bit of shopping while visiting Comanche County, TX, look no further! Woven Roots is an adorable boutique and home goods store located at 111 N. Houston St Comanche, Texas (on the historic square.) The owners, Jennifer Cisneroz and her daughter, Micah Taylor,  just celebrated their grand opening on March 9, 2019. They invite you to come on down, “to treat yourself to a heartwarming shopping experience. Where you can find a little something for everyone!” The store is open Tuesday through Friday from 10 A.M. until 5:30 P.M. and on Saturdays from 9:30 A.M. until 3:00 P.M. They are closed on Sunday and Monday. Woven Roots sells children’s clothes ranging from infant sizes all the way up to a 5T. Additionally, they have men and women’s clothing, shoes, gifts, kitchen goods, home decor, handcrafted furniture, and inspirational calligraphy signs from right here in Comanche, Texas. Currently, they have a 5.0 out of 5.0 rating on their Facebook page which can be reached at the following link: https://www.facebook.com/wovenrootsretail/.

Furthermore, they do free gift wrappings with the purchase and are described as having “very reasonable prices.” Overall, their goal is to “provide their customers with a welcoming atmosphere where they feel like family from the minute they walk through the front door.”  Mention this website and receive 5% off your purchase of any kitchen, bath, or body care items.

Shuga Pops

**SAVE 10% OFF YOUR PURCHASE AT SHUGA POPS IF YOU MENTION THIS WEBSITE**

This gourmet popcorn and vintage candy shop was recently established on October 1, 2018, by Beth Whitsell and her family. It is located at 156 N Texas in De Leon. Their motto is, “You are what you eat, so eat some sweets” which is absolutely perfect considering all the sweet treats they sell. The store is open Tuesday through Friday from 10:00 A.M. until 6:00 P.M. and then on Saturday from 10:00 A.M. until 2:00 P.M. They serve a variety of candies which includes vintage wax soda bottles, gummy pizza, rainforest frogs, jumbo jawbreakers, Lego brick candy, and a unique hard candy called dog food in addition to a variety of other types of candies. They also sell glass bottled soda in flavors ranging from coke and Dr. Pepper to more exotic flavors like Route Beer 66, Kiddy Piddle, and my personal favorite, Unicorn Yack. Furthermore, Shuga Pop’s pride and joy is their popcorn. It comes in a variety of different flavors and sizes. For instance, you can buy a Dilly Squat for $1 which is 1 ½ cups, a Just a Dab for $2.15 which is 3 cups, a Gimme for $4.25 which is 6 cups, a Lil Sumpin’ for $7.80 which is 11 ½ cups, a Kinfolk for $13.50 which is 19 cups, a Hankerin for $17.30 which is 28 ½ cups, a Bucketful for $19.40 which is 38 cups, and finally a Humdinger for $26.35 which is a whopping 85 ½ cups of popcorn. They can also color and flavor it different things like movie theater style, white cheddar, salt, and cheddar, to more exotic flavors like Texas Chilli, BBQ Bacon, and Ranch. At Easter one of their best sellers was Bunny Bait which was a combination of flavors and colors. Their goal is to have different specials like that for every holiday and special occasion. With that being said, this store has something for everyone. I highly encourage you to stop by if you ever find yourself passing through downtown De Leon or driving around the area on a beautiful day to take a look at historical markers in the county. If you mention this website to them, you will receive a 10% discount off your purchase. You can also contact them by phone at 254-893-2676. Be sure to stop by the Terrill Car Museum as well!

Proctor Lake, Gateway To Comanche County, Texas

By: Brandon Mangan



Proctor Lake in Comanche County, Texas has been a destination for fishing and recreation since it was created between the Sabana and Leon rivers in 1963. The Army Corps of Engineers maintains four parks on the lake – Copperas Creek, High Point, Promontory and Sowell Creek Park. Although High Point has been closed to vehicles for some time now there are still more than 10 miles of horse trails and scenic views to hike through.

Aside from High Point all parks offer various kinds of camping, including RV, tent, screened shelter, and group camping facilities. You can make reservations by calling 1-877-444-6777 or by visiting www.reserveusa.com. Sowell, Copperas and Promontory all offer day-use areas, as well as swimming beaches. Sowell Creek also has a play area for children at one of its swimming areas. There are multiple boat ramps and fishing docks between the parks, including handicap accessible docks like this newer addition to Copperas Creek.

Proctor is stocked regularly with various species of fish and is known as one of the premiere lakes in Texas when it comes to catching Crappie and the Hybrid Striped Bass species. Records from this lake include a 16lb Striper, a 13lb Largemouth, and an 87lb Blue Catfish.

Along with its fish, Proctor Lake is home to a diverse range of wildlife, from deer and feral hogs to songbirds and wildfowl. This wildlife has a home among a large array of wildflowers each spring, with Texas staples like Bluebonnets and Indian Paintbrushes decorating each of the lake’s parks. 

Speaking of a diverse range of wildlife, in 1985 James “Rusty” Branch discovered a dinosaur fossil site among the Twin Mountains formation of the lake, said to be “among the richest from the Lower Cretaceous of North America”. The species discovered there (recently named the Convolosaurus Marri) is the only example yet found in the world. The fossils are now curated in the Shuler Museum of Paleontology at Southern Methodist University.

[A skeleton formed from the fossils found at Proctor Lake]

Hunting is another activity that brings people to Proctor Lake. Migratory game bird hunting is allowed, requiring permits in some areas (which can be requested in person at the Proctor Lake Office located at 2180 HWY 2861, Comanche TX.) For more information, you can visit http://www.swf-wc.usace.army.mil/proctor/Recreation/Hunting.asp.

Hunting isn’t the only sport offered at the lake, P.A.R. Country Club is also located on the lake near Copperas Creek Park and offers a full 18 Hole golfing experience, along with its own bar and grill. You can contact P.A.R. Country Club for more information at: 254-879-2296.

Proctor Lake rests in a rural part of the Cross Timbers region and due to this, has darker skies than many parks across Texas. This affords its visitors a view of the night sky not found in many parts of the state. We hope you’ll come to visit and find out just how breathtaking it can be for yourself!

Article and Photography By Brandon Mangan